Water Point Data

Interview with Alexander Fischer from Oxford University

Date of interview: 2017/06/07

During the development of the white paper “Harnessing Water Point Data to Improve Drinking Water Services”, WASHNote spoke to Alexander Fischer, a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Oxford, at the time researching drinking water security, application of geospatial information systems, and sustainable resource governance. Complementary to the use of national water point atlases, the local context of the data matters.

“I’m interested in the characteristics and elements of the institutional change, specifically around the value of water point data in this process. I hope to find ways to enhance the scope and use of standardized water point data across multiple scales of decisionmakers, including local level service enterprises. In most regions of Bangladesh, for instance, water quality and specifically arsenic testing of tubewells, is a critical variable for drillers, users, and regulators whereas non-functionality rates are comparatively lower and secondary water points in close proximity.”

 

 

References

Gender Mainstreaming Vanuatu

In Vanuatu, UNICEF and partners a) improved water management and water system delivery through the establishment of Water User Committees, b) introduced mobile phone technology to monitor progress towards water and gender targets, c) build staff capacity on gender equality and women’s participation, d) supported the establishment of a mandatory gender balance in Water User Committees, and e) ensured policy and strategic reports to include an analysis of female participation. UNICEF used the data collected by mobile phones to analyze data on water systems. They found that when Water User Committees had women in key positions, the water system performance improved, the regularity of committee meetings improved and the number of fees that were collected improved.

References
WASHNote